A Chronology: 1973

Compiled by Howard Dodson

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1973

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IBW consults with several independent black schools in the development of their curricula including the Freedom Library Day School (Philadelphia) as well as the Nairobi Community College (California) and the Black Studies Program at Green Haven Correctional Institution in New York.

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IBW conducts a three-week course for the IFCO’s (Interreligious Foundation for Community Organization) Amilcar Cabral Training Institute, a community organizing training program for blacks and Chicanos.

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IBW drafts the preamble for the National Black Political Convention held in Gary, Indiana, as well as a draft series of items that were incorporated into the convention’s “Black Agenda for the Seventies.” Both are published in the IBW Monthly Report. This was an extension of the work IBW had been doing since 1970 to develop such a national black agenda of political, economic, social, and cultural priorities.

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Bill Strickland is part of a black delegation the Cuban government invites to visit Cuba and assess the progress of its revolution.

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Mervyn Josie of S.A.S.O. (South African Student Organization) and Sonny Leon of the Labor party of South Africa visit the Institute and consult with IBW staff.

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Other blacks from all over the world are weekly visitors to the Institute leading to exchanges and referrals to scholars, activists, and organizations involved in comparable or related work.

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IBW Senior Research Fellows continue to disperse as the economic condition of IBW is unable to support full time research staff. Robert Hill takes a teaching position at Northwestern University; William Strickland and Chester Davis move to the University of Massachusetts at Amherst; Vincent Harding is away from IBW working on what would become There Is a River.

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IBW awarded a grant of $150,000 – $100,000 for general operating support and $50,000 to support Vincent Harding’s research and writing projects on the history of the black freedom struggle and the last years of Martin Luther King, Jr. over the two-year period 1973-1975.

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Education and Black Struggle: Notes from the Colonized World is published as a special IBW-edited issued of the Harvard Educational Review. It features articles by St. Clair Drake, Grace Boggs, C.L.R. James, Walter Rodney, Robert Hill, Julius Nyerere and William Strickland. Vincent Harding’s “The Vocation of the Black Scholar and the Struggles of the Black Community” articulates IBW’s concept of scholarship in the service of black struggle.

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Joyce Ladner’s The Death of White Sociology is published by Random House. It is a searing critique of the study of blacks in American Sociology.

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Black Analysis for the Seventies (1971-1972) a compilation of the columns published in the Monthly Report is the first publication of the “IBW Press,” a printing operation developed and run by the IBW staff.

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IBW launches initiative to distribute free copies of Education and Black Struggle to prisoners who request a copy. A collection of prisoner correspondence to IBW was published in Education and Black Struggle.

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IBW Press publishes Black Analysis for the Seventies, 1971-1972, a compilation of five Black-World-View volumes written between June and December of 1971.